Eating Disorders Treatment and RecoveryFood Health 

Eating Disorders Treatment and Recovery

The behaviors related to eating disorders can be difficult to identify. But if these behaviors continue, or eating disorders are untreated, they can be life-threatening or cause severe medical complications. The cause of eating disorders is unknown, but is usually triggered by an individual’s desire for thinness.

The behaviors related to eating disorders can be difficult to identify. But if these behaviors continue, or eating disorders are untreated, they can be life-threatening or cause severe medical complications. The cause of eating disorders is unknown, but is usually triggered by an individual’s desire for thinness. Eating disorders are very complex and are best treated by professionals who are trained to provide specialized Eating Disorders Treatment.

Seeking help at an anorexia treatment center that has specialized programs and staff that is able to provide the best possible treatment for eating disorders. Anorexia is a serious, often chronic and life-threatening eating disorder. It includes intense fear of gaining weight, a distorted body image and amenorrhea which is absence of at least three consecutive menstrual cycles). A preoccupation with food and a refusal to maintain minimally normal body weight is the hallmark of Anorexia Nervosa.

Anorexia is a serious, often chronic and life-threatening eating disorder. It includes intense fear of gaining weight, a distorted body image and amenorrhea which is absence of at least three consecutive menstrual cycles). A preoccupation with food and a refusal to maintain minimally normal body weight is the hallmark of Anorexia Nervosa.

Recovering from an eating disorder involves a solid treatment team and developing a support system with family and friends. It is often with their support that people are able to ask for help to stop their eating disorder. Even so, patients continue to struggle, especially around the holidays.

Eating disorder patients have the following similar concerns each year:

Eating disorders patients have increased anxiety about the fact that often times during the holidays you see extended family members who are not seen at other times of the year. For someone with an eating disorder, they may believe that everybody’s attention is focused on that person. Even though it may not be true, it certainly feels this way to an individual who is recovering from anorexia or bulimia.

People with anorexia or bulimia typically feel that family members will be watching to see if they eat and how much they are eating. This, in itself, can make following a meal plan extremely difficult.

People worry and catastrophism (they assume the worst will happen) about the comments that may be made about their physical appearance. People with eating disorders may also take what is a well-meaning comment such as you look healthy and turn it into something negative.

Eating disorder patients are almost always overwhelmed by the amount of food, as well as the types of food present. For someone recovering from bulimia or anorexia, this can be an overwhelming experience.

Healthy support at the holidays

Eating disorder patients do not expect the food that is traditionally served at holiday gatherings be changed in order to make it easier on them. An important part of recovery is being present in the world and learning to cope with such triggers. But, there are a few things that may be helpful that will not make the individual feel there is too much focus on them.

Refrain from any comments about physical appearance will be helpful in not increasing the anxiety level of the person. As mentioned earlier, even the most positive comment can be twisted into something negative by a people with eating disorders. It may also be helpful to be mindful of the comments made about others physical appearance. It is common for people with anorexia or bulimia to struggle with physical comparisons.

Have distractions planned for the gathering such as a family game or moving into the living room to have conversation instead of remaining seated around the table may be helpful. This can take the focus off of the food and help put everyone at ease. Being away from the table can also help the person feel less self-conscious, thus potentially reducing anxiety.

Have an established safety plan with those closest to the person prior to walking into a situation known to be triggering. This can be as simple as having a code word they can use to step outside with a trusted person when they need to take a break from the crowd. Having a plan of what loved ones can do to provide support when they see the person with the eating disorder struggling is also helpful in reduction of anxiety.

It may be most important to know that sometimes there is nothing you can do to make the individual with the eating disorder feel comfortable and at ease during the family holiday. In these cases, the most you can do is help the person cope and manage their stress and anxiety.

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